PR Campaign Planning


How much does a PR campaign cost?

How much does a PR campaign cost?

How much does a PR campaign cost?

This week we’re talking about PR campaign costs, expensive violin strings, and how much of your budget you should think about investing in a PR campaign.

How much does a PR campaign cost?

This is a question many have asked and will continue to ponder, but nobody will ever be able to answer succinctly.

The reason? There are too many variables.

We tried to refrain from using the classic idiom ‘how long is a piece of string’, but this really is a situation where you could spend £1000 or £100k, and anything in between.

When we asked our Managing Director, Lorraine Emmett, if it was fair to compare string and PR campaign costs, she agreed:

“It is very much like a piece of string. You can get all types of string. You can pick it up free second hand at an allotment or pay $20m at auction for a Duport Stradivarius violin string.”

This may not appear to be helpful advice at first, but Lorraine further explained that people will always want to know an overall basic cost and will continue to ask how much a PR campaign will cost.

The key for people asking this question is to consider what they want to use their string for, how important it is, and how much of their budget they are willing to invest in the string to meet their needs.

b2b pr campaign planning leads to business growth upwards arrow
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How much should I spend on PR campaigns? 

Whether you are considering running a PR campaign in-house or looking for a PR agency to help, asking how much you should spend on PR campaigns is the wrong question to be asking.

Ask yourself, what could effective PR do for my business? What problems could it solve? How could it help me achieve my key business objectives?

To help answer these questions, why not look at what your competitors are doing. Are any of them doing PR? Are they successful?

Once you understand what you want to achieve with a PR campaign, the question shouldn’t be how much money to spend on it. Instead, look at your budget and work out how much of it you think would be worth investing.

 

“It is very much like a piece of string. You can get all types of string. You can pick it up free second hand at an allotment or pay $20m at auction for a Duport Stradivarius violin string.”

– Lorraine Emmett

PR agency costs

Hiring a PR agency to launch tactical and strategic PR campaigns doesn’t necessarily mean spending more on PR, or less for that matter. You could spend the same amount on an in-house campaign as you would with an agency. The decision comes down to putting your money where there is the most experience and expertise so that you’re more likely to see a return on your investment.

That’s why many business owners will turn to a PR agency, in some cases saving money as a PR agency will have set costs and establish a plan early on, including how the budget will be utilised.

You’re paying for experience, connections, and expertise when you hire a PR agency, but this also gives you a greater chance of launching successful PR campaigns. If in-house campaigns are having limited success, despite you spending a fair amount of your budget on them, external expertise may be what you need.

One area in-house teams (which realistically usually comes down to the marketing department) often neglect is the groundwork before PR delivery is attempted. When the communication strategy and campaign planning isn’t undertaken properly, a scattered or ad-hoc attempt at PR results – which is most likely to be ineffective.

b2b pr campaign planning leads to business growth upwards arrow

One EC-PR client that recognises the importance of this strategic groundwork and how an agency can add value is Dave Kelly, Managing Director at 2i after we developed a communication strategy for the business

 

“You have offered us enormous value in getting us to this stage. When I think back to the lack of focus and structure that our message had originally to where we are today, for both our clients and our staff, it’s been a game-changer for us and massive thanks to you for that.”

– Dave Kelly, Managing Director, 2i

 

This solid groundwork proved to be a valuable base from which 2i could then build their reputation and external communications.

Working with a PR agency gives you the choice when it comes to gaining expertise in specific areas – for example, your businesses may be equipped to develop your communication strategy and PR planning, but you need help with delivery. Others may be fine with delivery but struggle with the preparation work.

Investing money in an agency to pick up these problem areas for you makes more sense.

Many agencies will have a minimum threshold when it comes to the budget and will not accept clients with a budget they feel won’t deliver a good return.

At EC-PR, we have a modular package approach, designed to let you take as little or as much advantage of our expertise as needed.

Join our #B2BPR tribe:

If you’ve found this article valuable, you can get more useful insight here:

Download our comprehensive guide: B2B PR Campaign Planning for indispensible templates, examples and tools.

Download our pricing guide: How Much Does PR Cost? for our transparent modular pricing.

READ this Tech PR case study: How 2i found its voice – 18 Benefits from a communication strategy

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What Does A PR Campaign Consist Of?

What Does A PR Campaign Consist Of?

What Does A PR Campaign Consist Of?

Planning on writing a couple of articles, whizzing them off to an industry magazine and thinking your PR campaign is complete? 

Mention PR to the uninitiated and they may just associate the word with news articles and press interviews, but there is a little bit more to it than that.

Read on to discover what a great B2B PR campaign should consist of and how you can make your campaigns stand out from the crowd.

Why Run A PR Campaign?

You could run a PR campaign for several reasons – to achieve a general business goal, launch a new product or service, raise brand awareness, revive older products, or show off your new brand. The possibilities are wide and varied but there should always be a purpose.

All the reasons to run a campaign will likely have the overarching goal of engaging more customers with your business. From brand awareness to thought leadership – the underlying goal is to attract clients and grow your business.

b2b pr campaign planning leads to business growth upwards arrow

The PR Planning Process

What activities should you undertake as part of the campaign planning process?

Without a doubt, the most important part of your PR campaign is the planning, or preparation. A thoroughly researched and well-planned PR campaign is a successful campaign. For best success, these are the components each campaign plan should include:

The customer journey – how do your customers reach you? You need to understand the journey your customers go through before they are ready to buy from you. Depending on what stage they are at in their journey, customers will consume different types of content or respond to different types of calls to action.

A marketing asset audit – once you have completed your customer journey, you need to establish where you are missing content, where there are gaps in the journey, or where processes can be improved. This missing content represents opportunities to influence and guide your customers towards your brand.  Remember – you want to make it as easy as possible for people to make informed decisions about you, or your products and services.

A target persona map – target persona maps help you delve even deeper into the mind of your customer and understand what turns them on (and off!), how and where they are likely to encounter your messaging and what the triggers would be for them picking up the phone or making an order.

The plan – by now you should have a deeper understanding of what your customer journey looks like, what makes them buy, where they ‘hang out’ and what work needs to be done at your end to improve any touchpoints. Now it’s time to plan what your live campaign will look like! This will involve choosing which media channels you will use, what activities you will carry out, key milestones, and who is responsible for what.

The media environment – once you have your persona front and centre of your plans, you need to consider and benchmark the competitive media environment. What are the prevailing and emerging BIG issues you need to have a position on; what are your competitors saying on these issues, which topics do you have a unique point of view on that will advance or challenge the debate and how will you evidence that point of view.

The content – now comes the fun part! Create a content calendar and work out what media needs to be developed, what the format will be, and how it will be distributed. A content calendar is not a campaign in its own right – but it can be used to support the campaign narrative.

Planning A PR Campaign

Now you’re familiar with PR campaign planning, are you ready to start? Your essential guide to executing a successful B2B PR campaign plan contains everything you need to get going.

What Does A PR Campaign Consist Of?

Your PR campaign may contain many different activities and channels and, depending on where your target customer goes for information, you will need to consider a mix of paid, earned, owned, and shared media.

Paid media – choosing a paid media channel will depend on your target market but two commonly used tools are paid social media adverts (Facebook ads, for example), and Google Adwords (Pay Per Click/PPC)

Earned media – is what others are saying about you. You pitch your business or content to bloggers, influencers, websites, and industry publications in a way that makes you worthy of talking about.

Owned media – the content you created, own, and publish on your own channels. For example, a blog you publish on your website. Or a podcast you promote via Facebook.  

Shared media – shared media is basically social media. Technically, your content may still be owned but it will be reposted, adapted, and even repurposed by others. The trick is staying on top of this and how others are engaging with your business and content.

b2b pr campaign planning leads to business growth upwards arrow

Who Is Responsible for Your PR Campaign?

PR campaigns can be assembled by either an in-house team, overseen by a marketing manager or director or undertaken by an external specialist agency.

If all the above sounds like a lot of work…yes, it is but if the process is followed correctly, your margin of error is vastly reduced, and the likelihood of success is increased. That doesn’t mean it will be easy though.

For that reason, you may choose to engage a PR agency. The professional experience, advice, and practical help a PR company can bring to your campaigns will be unrivalled. It’s also worth looking for a PR agency with experience in your sector or at least specialising in B2B PR activities.

At ec-pr we are passionate about b2b communication. We believe your work is amazing and we want to help you tell the world how extraordinary it is. Get in touch.

Join our #B2BPR tribe:

If you’ve found this article valuable, you can get more useful insight here:

Download our comprehensive guide: B2B PR Campaign Planning for all the templates, examples and tools mentioned in this article.

READ this Tech PR case study: How 2i found its voice – 18 Benefits from a communication strategy

watch our video: how to identify your target audience”

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Including valuable example PR campaigns, templates and tools.

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How Can A PR Campaign Help My Business?

How Can A PR Campaign Help My Business?

How Can A PR Campaign Help My Business?

From recruitment to raising brand awareness – a great PR campaign can help your business in many ways. In the B2B world, PR is a fundamental part of your overall marketing strategy and shouldn’t be overlooked when it comes to allocating your budget.

Here are just some of the ways a PR campaign can be beneficial to your business.

Boosting Sales & Raising Brand Awareness With A PR Campaign

We get it; it can be hard deciding where to put your marketing spend when it comes to advertising your business, products, or services. Especially in the B2B sector where you are spoilt for choice when it comes to paid advertisement channels.

What method is going to be the most effective way to make your target audience aware of you and what you offer?

Well, a cost-effective way to achieve that is with a good PR campaign.

b2b pr campaign planning leads to business growth upwards arrow

A thoughtful PR campaign can attract new customers simply because your company is brought to their attention in a positive light. The fact that your brand is referenced in an editorial in a respected industry publication lends credibility to your company amongst your target audience. This is because subconsciously, the reader knows that editorial has been vetted and selected by an editor for inclusion in their publication.  Effectively, it has been given the Editor’s stamp of approval.  When your business is mentioned positively and catches people’s eye for the right reason, your credibility instantly rises.

Brand credibility can sometimes be the one deciding factor when customers choose who they want to buy from – this is especially true in niche sectors, where companies are providing similar products or services. When it comes down to making a final buying decision, the company with the most credible reputation is going to win hands down, every time.

After all – you wouldn’t be everywhere if you didn’t have a great company or service, right?

Publicity is absolutely critical. A good PR story is infinitely more effective than a front-page ad.

– Richard Branson.

So, in addition to boosting your reputation and attracting new clients, what else can a good PR campaign do for your business?

Other Ways PR Can Help Your Business

PR can positively affect areas of your business other than just your bottom line. Each PR campaign can be carefully tailored for a different outcome, but a general brand PR campaign can entice more than just customers.

For example, newish brands and start-ups can attract attention from potential investors by making their business appear larger than it is and the perception of uber relevance. You know what they say about faking it until you make it!  

More established businesses can also use PR strategically when they’re seeking new partnerships or considering selling.

b2b pr campaign planning leads to business growth upwards arrow

A PR campaign can also attract people to your business, not as customers but because they want to work for you. Although recruitment marketing is a separate area, general PR is also excellent for recruitment as more people are exposed to your brand, they get to know what you’re about and again, based on your credibility, will see you as a good employer.

This can be especially useful when you’re trying to recruit industry experts and specialists – being the most credible business in your sector will attract top-level talent.

Finally, another way a PR campaign can help your business is by helping repair your reputation.

Yes, we’re down to the topic not many businesses like to talk about or face but ignoring a reputational issue does not make it go away. Tackling a bad reputation can take time and you must be certain that the root issue has been resolved but a good PR campaign can go a long way towards making amends.

Getting Started With A PR Campaign

Now you’re familiar with some of the benefits a good PR campaign can have, are you ready to start? Your essential guide to executing a successful B2B PR campaign plan contains everything you need to get going.

At ec-pr we are passionate about b2b communication. We believe your work is amazing and we want to help you tell the world how extraordinary it is. Get in touch.

Join our #B2BPR tribe:

If you’ve found this article valuable, you can get more useful insight here:

Download our comprehensive guide: B2B PR Campaign Planning for all the templates, examples and tools mentioned in this article.

READ this Tech PR case study: How 2i found its voice – 18 Benefits from a communication strategy

watch our video: how to identify your target audience”

PR Guide to B2B PR Campaign Planning

Your complete Guide to B2B PR Campaign Planning

Including valuable example PR campaigns, templates and tools.

Download

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Your 8-Step Communication Strategy

8-Step Communication strategy guide

A comprehensive guide to delivering your business goals using intelligent and relevant messaging.

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Our insights

IPTEnergised Environment PR Case Study

IPTEnergised Environment PR Case Study

ITPEnergised

B2B PR Case Study - energy & environment
ipte environment pr case study

BACKGROUND

Founded in 2013, ITPEnergised is a world leading consultancy providing energy, environmental, engineering, technical advisory and renewables asset management services on thousands of projects at all scales, in more than 150 countries.

itpenergised-logo

Problem

Lack of clarity and consistency in marketing communications with energy and environment target audiences

With an ambitious and visionary Managing Director at the helm, Jonny Clark was focused on growing the business but recognised that to do so, there were aspects of the business that required attention.  Particularly, the absence of a clearly defined communication strategy meant that there was a lack of consistency across the organisation when communicating with its target audience both in how it differentiates itself and why customers should care.

envrionment pr and communication strategy to stand out
With a rapidly growing market and competition fierce, it became clear that a more targeted and focused approach to its marketing and communications was needed to ensure ITPEnergised stood out from the crowd and were in the best possible position to deliver against their growth objectives.

SOLUTION

Communication strategy,  stakeholder research and B2B PR campaign planning

Through the facilitation of its Messaging Lab workshops and in-depth engagement with the senior leadership team, EC-PR developed a communication strategy which included five key components:

1 the value proposition;
2 industry prioritisation;
3 target personas;
4 positioning statements
5 and messaging.

This strategy now forms the backbone, to inform and guide all marketing communications moving forward.

To ensure the communication strategy is aligned with customers’ perceptions, EC-PR also conducted validation research amongst a small group of ITPE’s external stakeholders.

 

Outcome

“Thanks to EC-PR’s support, we now have a blueprint which clearly defines how sales and marketing are going to assist us in delivering the business plan, providing us with clarity as to where we need to invest our resources for greatest impact.  We now feel a sense of empowerment and it has renewed passion and pride in what makes the ITPE brand so special.”

Jonny Clarke

Managing Director, ITPEnergised

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What is branding and why is it a key component of your PR strategy?

What is branding and why is it a key component of your PR strategy?

What is branding and why is it a key component of your PR strategy?

Branding plays a fundamental role in how your customers, and potential customers, perceive your company.

Branding and PR

This perception, and image, of your brand is shaped by how you look, how you act and what you say.   Which is exactly why PR and branding are closely connected; both are ultimately about image management.

This week, we’re taking an in-depth look at what branding means to different people within the marketing industry and we’ve asked three industry experts to give us their take on what branding is and how they define it.

First to comment is Sally Fisher, an independent marketing consultant, who runs Marketing, Done In A Day. Sally says that she’s often explaining the difference between marketing and branding.

You can read Sally’s blog on this matter here, but here’s her perspective…

One thing I’ve noticed recently is that there’s often much confusion around what ‘Marketing’ is versus what ‘Branding’ is…

Marketing and Branding are two different concepts; they’re intrinsically and unequivocally linked and each can, and does, impact the other, but they’re two different things.

Brand image

Branding is about creating a full and holistic personality for your business – your vision, your mission, your values and your value proposition.  These are the foundational aspects of your business which help create and project your personality, how you look, what you say, the way you do things, the service and experience you provide.

Your brand identity such as your colours, your logo and your tone of voice etc should represent your brand personality, and together they should all present a joined up, consistent and positive brand experience.

Marketing activity

Marketing is the act of growing your business and making you money – actively targeting the right customers in the right place, using the right channels to position your business on their consideration list and ideally, persuade them to buy from you. Your marketing efforts utilise your brand components to present a consistent, joined-up message.

Coca-Cola Brand

If we consider the ubiquitous brand Coca-Cola – the first thoughts that come to mind are: Red, white, global, refreshment, diet drink, consistent, reliable – these are the brand aspects of Coca-Cola and represent how they’ve chosen to position themselves in our minds.

But their marketing efforts are how they target us as customers, how they sell their drinks to us, their chosen advertising channels, the messages they communicate and their distribution choices – making Coca-Cola available to us all, globally!

In a nutshell, your brand is how you are perceived in the minds of your customers – your brand is what you ‘ARE‘!

Your marketing is the planning and action you take to acquire and retain your customer – marketing is what you ‘DO’

Sally Fisher – Marketing, Done in a Day.

Julie Frances, a Creative Director at Creative Fire says that questions around branding can often be tricky to answer. 

She explains the origins of the term and what her take on branding is here:

The term “brand” came from cattle ranchers over 50 years ago and in the late 80’s, companies like Coca-Cola started to brand their packaged goods in a way that differentiated them from the bland competition.

As time went on and marketeers got savvy, they realised that there was more to ‘a brand’ than just a company name and a pretty box!

Branding has evolved and with time, it has become more subjective. Branding has become more about a person’s feelings (or perception) for a product, service or business.

Let’s explain what branding is not.

Branding is not limited to a logo or a colour scheme. It is not simply to make people aware of your business or service. These are critical elements of the brand building process, but these only scratch the surface.

It’s also important to acknowledge the difference between branding and marketing.

Marketing is the activity designed to promote your business; it will complement branding, but it doesn’t replace it.

Here is our take on what branding is.

1 Brands mean different things to different people.

It can play a different role depending on who it interacts with and when. Some people will connect meaningfully with an aspect of a brand while others won’t. Quite often a person’s relationship with a brand can develop, increasing trust, loyalty and engagement. Smart and successful brands work hard to reach different audiences who matter to their business to cement the relationship with the brand.

2 Brands grow, develop, respond and shift with the times.

It helps to think of branding as an ever-evolving experience rather than a structured set of rules. A brand can be the sum of interactions with infinite possibilities and every touch point makes a difference.

3 Brands are about feelings.

When you ask people why they love certain brands, they might provide a list of logical reasons but in the end, it often comes down to a feeling. How does that brand really make them feel? Successful brands hold great emotional meaning for people and that’s what can make a brand loved and respected.

4 Discussing the impact of a brand is easier than defining what a brand is.

When we talk about defining a brand, we often talk about what makes a brand impactful for a business. It might be better ROI or an aligned leadership. Impact from a brand refresh or a new positioning, a great campaign or just more brand engagement is where you really see a brand doing its job well. For example, the impact of an engaged workplace can create increased innovation, productivity, creativity and loyalty amongst employees and new recruits.

Ultimately, your brand is what the marketplace says it is. 

– Brian Woyt, Founder of the branding agency Wolf & Missile.

Establishing an understanding about how you and your business define your brand and what it means can help guide your brand and business forward. But remember, it doesn’t matter if you think your brand has the potential to be the next Apple or Nike — what really matters is what your target audience thinks of your brand.

10 steps to help build a brand:

  1. Establish the purpose
  2. Identify the target audience
  3. Create a unique voice for your brand
  4. Tell your brand’s story
  5. Design the brand’s visual elements
  6. Establish a differentiation
  7. Build out your brand
  8. Promote, promote, promote
  9. Get advocates for your brand
  10. Evolve as you grow

-Julie Frances, Creative Director at Creative Fire

And finally, Amir Bazrafshan, Founder of Apricot Box says that If you want your business to stand out, be remembered and be valuable, then branding is a term you need to understand intimately.

If you don’t understand what branding is, you won’t be able to use it to your advantage. That’s what this blog post aims to clarify so that you know what branding is, what it entails and why it’s essential to the long-term growth of your business.

What branding isn’t

Branding is often used interchangeably with things such as a logo, identity, a product or a promise.

But branding is none of these.

For example, a logo is a very useful business tool that helps to add distinctiveness and recognition, but it’s not branding – it’s a symbol of the brand.

So this begs the obvious question…

…what is it?

Simply put, branding is the process of giving meaning to your business and its offering.

The power of branding means that you can take something, even if it’s a commodity and use branding to:

  1. Differentiate from similar products/services
  2. Be easily recognisable
  3. Be recalled at points of purchase more readily (i.e. be top of mind)
  4. Command premium prices (helping to increase your profits)
  5. Earn loyalty

Those that understand branding will understand that it’s one of the best and most important investments that a company can make.

The tools of branding

Branding is a long term and ongoing process and there are many tools and techniques that a business must draw upon to get it right.

Your brand will live in the minds of your audience so what and how you communicate plus the quality of service/products and follow up all matter – they all work together to build a brand.

Products are made in a factory, but brands are created in the mind. 

Walter Landor.

How do you ensure that all these separate parts are pulling in the same direction and stay coherent over the long term?

By developing a solid brand strategy.  

This document is your road map. It will guide operational and creative decisions. It helps to unite a business and all stakeholders.

Trying to brand your business without a brand strategy would be like trying to drive to a specific destination without a map. In the fog. Whilst blindfolded. Don’t do it!

Elements of your strategy should include details on objectives, market segments, mission, values and a strategic position.  All of this will help you to be deliberate in your choices around your brand identity.

Your brand identity is a collection of elements that you use to articulate your strategy to your target audience – so things such as:

  • Logo
  • Other distinctive visual assets
  • Colours
  • Tone of voice
  • Messaging
  • Font selection
  • Photo style
  • Etc.

These must all work together as a system, with a common through line – the through line being what you want people to know and understand about your brand – what you want to mean to them.

The thing is, people are so busy and are exposed to so many different stimuli on a moment by moment basis and so, you have to be very selective about what you want people to know about your brand.

Your strategy will help you to define this and be purposeful about it.

Once you have your brand strategy and identity defined, it’s time to execute.

branding and pr are about perception and reputation

The branding mindset

A brand isn’t grown overnight – branding is an ongoing and long-term process and commitment.

If you don’t embrace the long-term nature of branding, then you’ll be frustrated and not get the results that are possible.

Building brand reputation

The way that branding works is that you make impressions on your audience, day by day, message by message, experience by experience – all of which compound into a specific meaning that the audience has of your business and offering.

And all of this takes time!

If your strategy and execution is on point, then what your audience understands of you will be very close to what you want them to understand.

Meaning, those benefits – recognition, distinctiveness, premium prices, long term growth and stability, will be yours to enjoy.

Your brand is the single most important investment you can make in your business 

– Steve Forbes, Editor in chief, Forbes Magazine.

-Amir Bazrafshan, Founder of Apricot Box

Why is having a strong brand important for B2B PR?

Branding and PR may sit separately within your organisation, but they must work together seamlessly to build customer trust and create a positive brand perception. This can only be delivered through a cohesive, optimised, and effective communication strategy.

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As Ted Reubin said so articulately: “Your brand is what your business does, what you stand for, and how you approach your work. You have significant control over your brand because you are able to decide what you want to do and how you want to do it. You can’t completely control how others see your brand, but you can do everything within your power to leave them with a positive impression.

Your reputation is what people remember and share about you. Living up to the standards of your brand doesn’t guarantee a good reputation, but it’s an excellent place to start. Brands that are reliable, accountable, and customer-friendly will often have a positive reputation, but it’s no guarantee.”

Brand reputation and PR

Reputation stems from how you make people feel about your brand and how your stakeholders pass on that experience to others. You have to work hard at shaping that reputation through proactive and authentic marketing communication programmes i.e. public relations.

Join our #B2BPR tribe:

If you’ve found this article valuable, you can get more useful insight here:

Download our complete guide to B2B PR Campaign Planning

READ this Tech PR case study: How 2i found its voice: The 18 benefits of a communication strategy

watch our video: how to identify your target audience”

At ec-pr we are passionate about b2b communication. We believe your work is amazing and we want to help you tell the world how extraordinary it is. Get in touch.
PR Guide to B2B PR Campaign Planning

Your complete Guide to B2B PR Campaign Planning

Including example PR campaigns, content calendar templates, and audit checklists.

Download

Subscribe to our updates

Stay up to date with the latest insights, case studies, and PR guides.

Your 8-Step Communication Strategy

8-Step Communication strategy guide

A comprehensive guide to delivering your business goals using intelligent and relevant messaging.

Download

How to conduct a marketing asset audit and why it is an essential step in B2B PR campaign planning

How to conduct a marketing asset audit and why it is an essential step in B2B PR campaign planning

How to conduct a marketing asset audit and why it is an essential step in B2B PR campaign planning

In order activate your communication strategy you need marketing assets which serve up your messaging to your target audience – seems obvious doesn’t it? 

But, if you have any legacy material, which is not on-message, you really don’t want it used by sales or marketing as it can serve to confuse and distract your target audience

Your current campaign messaging should be in a format that is interesting and engaging and in a media channel they are familiar with. Most importantly you want to be sure the messaging is accessible. Any irrelevant, legacy, information needs to be identified and weeded out, or archived away. A marketing asset audit is the equivalent of a spring clean as you move away from the communication strategy phase and into the campaign planning phase.

What is a marketing asset audit?

A marketing asset audit is a review of all your marketing collateral that helps to ensure everything is aligned, on message, and on-brand. It is an incredibly useful tool that helps to analyse current marketing efforts, assess ways to improve and create a strategy that presents campaigns with clarity and focus.

With that in mind, what are the steps involved in a marketing asset audit?

1 Start by outlining all your goals and objectives

Your marketing goals should be comprehensive and consider both short-term and long-term business goals. Outline what those goals and objectives are, and what you hope to achieve. Whether that’s improving customer retention or increasing business conversions, you need to put them in order of priority and determine what resources they will need.

2 Review your content portfolio

Create a spreadsheet with everything in your arsenal, that includes blogs, articles, whitepapers, social media posts, and their accompanying stats, so you have a better overview of what’s working and what’s not. How did they perform? Did they achieve the engagement you’d hoped they would?

3 Ask yourself ‘is our content serving its purpose?’

If an asset doesn’t enable or enhance the customer journey, and can’t be improved or repurposed, it should be archived. This could be for a variety of reasons:

  • Off-brand or using old branding styles
  • Confusing, unclear
  • Surplus to requirements

Every touchpoint with your brand needs to be aligned and of exceptional quality.

Archiving redundant content that no long aligns with your communications strategy will help you stay focused. It also means that you can stop spending money unnecessarily on strategies that aren’t having a positive impact.

marketing asset audit every asset must be valuable
PR Guide to B2B PR Campaign Planning
Your complete Guide to B2B PR Campaign Planning

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The importance of marketing asset audits to the buying cycle

A marketing asset audit will help you deliver relevant messaging in compelling formats to target personas. This is essential for campaign planning as it ensures that at every stage of the journey, customers receive an appropriate type of message that nudges them to the next stage of the buying process.

Over time you will acquire a range of tactical and ad hoc assets which may no longer be relevant and simply serve to confuse the current target audience. Reviewing your marketing efforts with an audit will help you filter out irrelevant content and help to determine what assets are missing and how you can plug those gaps.

This will help you see your company as part of the ‘bigger picture’, improving your brand proposition against competitors in the industry and helping you to stand out.

creating a marketing asset list

What makes an effective and efficient marketing asset audit?

When you have reviewed your content, archived redundant pieces, and decided which ones will be refreshed or repurposed, you should map your content alongside the customer journey.

We recommend mapping the customer journey in detail, capturing all their touchpoints with your brand and rating each touchpoint by quality and importance. Along the different stages of the buyer’s journey (awareness, interest, desire, and action) engaging and relevant messaging is crucial. It needs to initially draw leads into the funnel, and then ensure those leads willingly move through the cycle to eventually become a loyal customer and advocate.

If you want to stay ahead of the curve and use your budget in the most effective way, make sure that audits are a consistent part of your growth plan rather than a last-minute thought. An effective marketing asset audit will help you remove content that no longer functions in the funnel and aid you in the creation of marketing materials that drive brand trust and demonstrate value to your target customers.

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