B2B PR Blog

Make the most our of your B2B PR activity.

Our ec-pr blog holds a wide variety of articles covering Communication, writing Press Releases and Editorial, preparing and making the most of Trade Events and Networking, and much, much more.

Do tell us if you’d like to have our insight on a particular subject, and don’t forget that you can pick up our free guides about event publicity or becoming an Influencer here. Please contact us if you’d like to talk about adding ec-pr to your Marketing team.


How Can PR Support My SEO?

How Can PR Support My SEO?

How Can PR Support My SEO?

SEO and PR are important functions for businesses, and both fall under the broad umbrella of marketing. For some, that may be where the association ends but for businesses looking for maximum success when it comes to reaching audiences and boosting their reputation, PR and SEO work together quite nicely.

Let’s look at the difference between PR and SEO, and how you can use PR to support your SEO strategy.

The Difference Between PR and SEO

You may think this question is a little bit like asking the difference between night and day. PR and SEO are obviously quite different, right?

PR is used to promote your brand in a good light and communicate messages to your target audience whilst the primary goal of any SEO (search engine optimisation) strategy is to help boost your online authority and help get your website to the top of Google’s search engine rankings.

They seem to be two hugely different disciplines, but once you take a closer look, PR and SEO have a few things in common.

Microphones on table for press interview

What Do PR And SEO Have In Common?

Mention SEO to someone not in the know and they may think it’s all keywords, optimising your website with technical backend stuff, and link building…whilst a good SEO strategy does include those areas, producing authoritative content to convince your audience (and Google) that you are an expert at what you do plays a key role in SEO.

Expertly produced content that serves a purpose – to educate, inform or inspire, is one of the best ways to get both search engines and your target audience to recognise your authority in your area of expertise and trust you.

Doesn’t that sound an awful lot like PR? Components of PR, such as a thought leadership strategy and earned media are very similar to SEO. You will never truly succeed at SEO if you can’t first convince your audience that you are worth their time. Recognition and authority online must be earned and built up. The same goes for PR – the aim is to speak to your target audience and convince them of your authority.

Expertly produced content that serves a purpose – to educate, inform or inspire, is one of the best ways to get both search engines and your target audience to recognise your authority in your area of expertise and trust you.

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READ: How to select the marketing tools for your integrated PR campaign (PESO)

How Can PR Support SEO?

In addition to having similar aims, there are several ways PR can support SEO.

One of the biggest crossover areas where PR and SEO can work harmoniously is link building. Link building (gaining links to your website from other websites) can be one of the most time-consuming tasks in SEO but the effort is often worth it to ensure your website gains authority.

If part of your PR strategy involves reaching out to the press and journalists to achieve online coverage, those online articles will often contain links back to your website. Even without these links, online coverage can assist SEO, but multiple links leading back to your website are much better and help boost the authority of your site.

However, it is important to note that not all links are equal. In SEO, the objective is to obtain high-quality backlinks. That means links from sites that are already ranking and have good domain authority. PR can help in this area as the websites approached for article placement or mentions will often meet both those criteria – national media and established industry websites, for example.

Microphones on table for press interview
Another way PR can support SEO is with messaging and targeting. Your PR strategy will usually include a communication plan, part of this may be persona or audience research and clarity on the message which needs to be delivered. This groundwork can provide a great basis for SEO when it comes to creating messages and targeting audiences.

If your PR strategy includes a content calendar, there is also an opportunity to take this even further and ensure planned PR content supports SEO, with keywords, for example.

With all this in mind, it makes sense that PR and SEO should be considerate of each other and more integrated even though they are different sections of your overall marketing activities.

Integrated PR

An integrated PR approach means aligning your PR activity with other marketing activities to drive maximum impact and effect. This includes SEO.

In-house, an integrated approach to PR may mean getting different teams working together, drawing on individual knowledge and skills.

If you outsource your PR to an agency and want to ensure SEO isn’t forgotten about, then look for an agency that champions this integrated approach.

Whichever option you choose an integrated approach will ensure your brand is regularly in front of your target audience with a relevant and compelling message and that you engage with your (potential) customers and drive new leads. It also ensures your resources and efforts are optimised for a maximum Return on Investment (ROI).

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5 tips for a successful analyst briefing

5 tips for a successful analyst briefing

5 tips for a successful analyst briefing

During conversations with clients or prospects about an analyst relations programme and specialist skills related to an analyst relations practice, we often hear questions along the lines of, “But an analyst briefing, surely that’s like hosting a press interview?”

Not quite, no.

Industry analysts are a distinct group of influencers with deep specialist expertise in their segment of the technology market and have specific ways of working. A tailored approach is required to develop a strong relationship between an analyst and an executive, and regular, well-prepared and meticulously executed analyst briefings are at the core of such a relationship-building programme.

Let’s look at our five top tips for organising and facilitating a successful industry analyst briefing.

Prep, prep, prep

Compared to a ‘standard’ press interview, an analyst briefing requires a greater investment of time in preparation and pre-briefing of executives.

There is no set way to do this but a detailed briefing note containing an overview of an analyst’s background and a summary of relevant pieces of published research (including blogs and key social media posts) is essential, along with additional insights into their opinions on the subject matter in question. It is best practice to add some notes or thoughts on the analyst’s overall approach (e.g. formal/informal) gleaned from previous interactions.

An analyst briefing should ideally be part of an ongoing programme of interactions so, a quick snapshot of any key questions raised during previous briefings is worth flagging during an executive pre-briefing to facilitate a personalised approach.

2 Tailored slide deck

It is recommended to use a slide deck to introduce key company/division/product developments and updates. Bear in mind that you are speaking to an expert so content should be focused and detailed, with strong proof-points and (ideally) examples of customer implementation.

Information about your company’s vision, go-to-market strategy, key company stats and future roadmap are important too.

Analysts love to prepare for a briefing so slide decks should be sent across at least 24 hours before the meeting to facilitate their own preparation.

analyst relations briefings.part of ongoing investment

3 Build in time for Q&A (and stick to it)

An analyst briefing is longer than a press interview and more focused on a specific segment of the market. Industry analysts are a great source of industry expertise which they are willing to share so allowing time for gauging their opinions and market insights is worthwhile.

We recommend that executives dedicate at least 15 minutes of a 1-hour briefing to Q&A. This will provide suitable time for ideas exchange and gathering of feedback.

4 Impeccable logistics

Every business meeting (either in-person, on the phone or via an online platform) should be meticulously planned from a logistics point of view – analyst briefings are no exception.

Double-check those time zones (many analysts have global roles and are based around the world), dial-in details or online conference call settings. If you are planning to use an online platform, do opt for a secure, robust, and paid-for option to avoid any technical hiccups. Make sure your executives are familiar with the platform too as they are the ones who will normally be sharing their slide deck. Precious introductory minutes should be spent on building rapport and introducing all parties, rather than trying to make the screen share work!

Global analyst webinars are a good format for briefing larger groups of analysts on an important update. These will require several dry runs (and a back-up platform) to ensure everything goes smoothly on the big day.

analyst briefing source of expert knowledge

5 Diligent follow-up

Ensure that any follow-up actions such as requests for additional information or materials are completed. Building relationships with analysts is a long-term, ongoing investment – follow-ups also present an opportunity to continue the conversation, showcase expertise and provide useful information/proof-points.

Analyst briefings are a fantastic platform for bringing your key target analysts up to speed on the strategic direction of your company and the maturity of your solutions. If executed well, they can also be an excellent source of expert knowledge and market insights that inform your strategic planning.

At ec-pr we are passionate about b2b communication. We believe your work is amazing and we want to help you tell the world how extraordinary it is. Get in touch.

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The Definitive Guide to Analyst Relations

and how to ensure its success

The Dos and Don'ts of Analyst Relations to help build credibility with industry influencers.

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PR Or Advertising For B2B Businesses?

PR Or Advertising For B2B Businesses?

PR Or Advertising For B2B Businesses?

If you’re a B2B business, you likely have a more limited marketing budget so are inclined to be more careful and sceptical where your money goes. You want guaranteed results and a cost-effective way to reach your strategic goals.

It can be difficult to decide where to invest your marketing budget – especially when it comes to deciding between PR and advertising. Should you choose one or the other? Is one better than the other? Or should you blend the two?

Let’s find out. 

What Is The Difference Between PR and Advertising?

First, let’s look at the differences between PR and advertising, which are two very different things.

The key and most obvious difference between PR and advertising is that you will pay for advertising space whilst PR, or editorial space is earned. And no, that doesn’t mean PR doesn’t cost (managing PR requires an investment – either by hiring a PR professional or a PR agency) but the implication is different. 

Editorial is often seen as more trustworthy, is usually more cost-effective, and creates a long term narrative or story – this is especially valuable in B2B where the sales cycle is much longer than B2C.

7 Differences between Advertising and Public Relations Infographic

Should B2B Brands Choose One Over The Other?

Customers are savvy enough now to know advertisements are paid for. Therefore, your business can say anything (within reason!) and it isn’t necessarily true or verified. In comparison, reading a piece of editorial content about your company, written by a third party, will be viewed as ‘trustworthy’ or truthful.

This is particularly important for B2B audiences where a lot of value is placed on trust, honesty, and thought leadership.

Perhaps in B2C audiences, it is accepted that adverts exist to manipulate us and may not be entirely representative of the truth? Adverts aren’t there to educate and inform, with limited space and a largely visual format, adverts are there to provoke an emotional response.

B2B personas infographic

An article from Marketing Week recently revealed that the ‘majority of B2B advertising is ‘ineffective’ with 75% of B2B brands failing to produce advertising with the potential to drive long-term growth.

What was interesting in this article was the ‘why’. In a nutshell, adverts produced by the B2B sector failed to get that emotional response from potential customers. They weren’t creative enough and tended to focus on benefits, features, and the nitty-gritty info. Which is great but didn’t get customers excited. Food for thought when it comes to creating advert visuals.

We say, adverts should and can be used as a part of your overall PR campaign – it isn’t a case of choosing one or the other. There is room to use adverts alongside PR, but the timing and context need to be right.

 

There is room to use adverts alongside PR, but the

timing and context need to be right. 

To be effective advertising needs a specific message and objective together with regular exposure to its target audience. For example, adverts could be used to promote an event, white paper or webinar but PR will be used to promote the expertise captured within the event, white paper or webinar to educate, influence or persuade the target audience.

However, the ‘regular exposure’ element can often be the tipping point for many B2B brands – there is no skirting around the issue of cost. Regular exposure costs money and can quickly swallow up a communications budget.

PR on the other hand can be used to share a narrative or series of interrelated thoughts and ideas which can be achieved cost-efficiently through news, thought leadership, blogs and journalist briefings.

For many businesses, the blend of PR and advertising used will ultimately come down to cost and how much you’re willing to invest.

Join our #B2BPR tribe:

At ec-pr we are passionate about b2b communication. We believe your work is amazing and we want to help you tell the world how extraordinary it is.

Download The Definitive Guide to Analyst Relations and how to ensure its success

READ this post: No Industry Is Too Complex For PR

look at this Infographic: 9 Points To Improve Your PR Brief

The Definitive Guide To Analyst Relations cover

The Definitive Guide to Analyst Relations

and how to ensure its success

The Dos and Don'ts of Analyst Relations to help build credibility with industry influencers.

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What’s Changed In Tech PR Over The Last 12 Months?

What’s Changed In Tech PR Over The Last 12 Months?

What’s Changed In Tech PR Over The Last 12 Months?

As a tech PR agency, we have a vested interest in keeping up to date with what is happening in the tech industry. The last 12 months haven’t been an exception, but it has certainly been a bumper year for the industry with tech stories frequently featured in national media and more people relying on technology than ever before.

Before the Covid-19 pandemic PR for the technology sectors sometimes had to get a little creative, especially in the B2B arena where quite frankly, the subject matter can be a little dry! 2020 was the year that took some quite an ordinary tech from the B2B world and made it mainstream.

Quite honestly, who used Zoom this frequently before the pandemic? 2020 saw the remote meeting software provider score a 326% rise in sales. Great PR for the company – and then came the memes. From Jackie Weaver having no authority to various politicians showing themselves up – online meetings are a new source of entertainment (when they go wrong) and nine times out of ten, Zoom is mentioned in these stories.

B2B personas infographic

With everyone trapped at home for most of 2020 and the early part of this year, the way we work has been transformed and many tech companies are facilitating this transformation – think of all the infrastructure required to enable entire businesses to work from home, be able to contact each other, and for customers to be able to reach them.

The growth of tech hasn’t just impacted work time either – with spare time to kill and nothing much to do at home, the reliance on social media platforms, communication technologies, internet connectivity, and home shopping has soared.

Some of these areas were already seeing expansion and growth before the pandemic, but development was sped up by the rise in demand over the last 12 months. Augmented reality, for example, has experienced unprecedented growth as people look for new ways to experience shopping at home.

Has That Changed Tech PR?

With so much happening, and happening fast, tech PR professionals and agencies have had to become even more responsive and adaptable.

Tech PR has always required a high degree of responsiveness because technology is inherently fast-moving but 2020/21 has kept everyone on their toes.

The Coronavirus pandemic has touched every single part of the tech industry, including those we work closely with such as science, transport, and cybersecurity.

B2B personas infographic

For PR agencies there has been more crisis management than ever, probably a once in a lifetime happening actually! And as you can see from the stories above, editorial has been easier to secure for some industries as there doesn’t seem to be a day that has gone by without some part of a big tech narrative appearing in national news.

It’s been a mixed bag really. A big mixed, unprecedented bag.

Some tech industries have suffered during the pandemic, others have prospered.

One common narrative across all tech clients was the need to address the pandemic, logistics, safety issues and staff wellbeing. That was at the start of the crisis – once the dust had settled and the words ‘new normal’ started to appear alarmingly regular in the media, the tech industry was keen to demonstrate their relevance in this new normal, and how they could legitimately solve issues for businesses, and the public.

We’ve had to adapt our working practices too – we’re a London based tech PR agency and much of our time was spent attending tech events all over the city, meeting with clients or working together at our office. Like many businesses, we’ve had to make the shift to home working, and digital meetings.

We’re looking forward to what is to come – even before the pandemic, the tech industry was an ever-evolving and exciting (to us!) space to be in – Covid-19 just accelerated it even further.

Join our #B2BPR tribe:

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The Ultimate Guide to Crisis PR

Unforeseen circumstances have hit us all in 2020. Our guide shows you how to manage your PR in a crisis.

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What’s The Difference Between B2B PR & B2C PR?

What’s The Difference Between B2B PR & B2C PR?

What’s The Difference Between B2B PR & B2C PR?

You will no doubt be familiar with the terms business to consumer (B2C) and business to business (B2B) PR. You may even understand that these two styles of PR are different, but can you put your finger on the differences?

Most understand B2C is consumer-based and automatically think of fast-moving goods – the type of goods we all consume every day, such as food and drink, clothing, or gadgets. 

It’s easier to understand as almost all of us will have encountered B2C PR in action – we’re all consumers of goods.

B2B PR is PR all the same, except it involves businesses selling to other business and not to consumers.

In B2B PR we even use many of the same methods, tools, and techniques as B2C. PR is one discipline and the way we go about generating buzz, creating opportunities, and building reputation and brand awareness are similar, no matter the target market or client.

B2B personas infographic

Why Is B2B PR Different?

Although B2B and B2C PR have much in common, there is one key difference – B2B PR exists in a vastly different commercial environment.

Firstly, the sales cycle can be years in B2B. Because the products and services being sold to other businesses are often a large investment or involve contracts that can last multiple years, the buying process is nothing like consumer sales. For example, a business selling global IT services will often have to contend with the fact that buyers are going to act slowly. This can be because of tender processes, contracts, or simply because the product or service in questions is not something one would buy every week.

This means B2B businesses need to ensure their PR campaigns have a strong strategic component so that they don’t get lost or diluted over time. 

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READ: 10 Reasons your brand needs PR

For example, a customer wouldn’t buy a global IT system on a whim – they may be tied into a contract for a few years or have multiple people involved in research at their end. From a PR perspective, you need to keep the conversation and engagement, interesting and vibrant for 3, 5,10 years possibly.

Speaking of multiple people, a further layer of complexity is often added in the B2B world as decision-making processes nearly always involve more than one person. The decision-making process may not be easy either with multiple experts and factors impacting the selection and commitment process.

Multiple actors with different, possibly conflicting, motivations and values need to be considered, prioritised, and addressed. This is why persona profiles are an important element of your B2B PR strategy. Creating persona profiles isn’t unique to B2B PR – as consumers, we’re all heavily profiled but multiple, and complex players are something to be mindful of when creating your PR strategy.

Decision-makers also take their time within the buying cycle as the implications of a mis-purchase can be much higher than in a consumer market.

B2B personas infographic

For example, if you decide to buy some chocolate and your chosen treat turns out to be a disappointment, the implications are relatively low for both you and the chocolate seller. You just wouldn’t buy that chocolate again. The wrong product or service in the B2B world could have enormous implications for a business, hence the need for a protracted buying cycle and multiple decision-makers and experts.

An excellent way to coax decision-makers along the way and alleviate fears around bad choices is for businesses to position themselves as thought leaders within their industry, helping guide and educate potential clients. Possessing a perceived high degree of trust and knowledge can be invaluable to a B2B business.  

Finally, and conversely – although B2B purchases tend to be much more expensive than consumer products and services, the size of the budget behind B2B PR campaigns tends to be much smaller!

That means that to be effective in your PR you must be collaborative, expert and, perhaps surprisingly, passionate – in an enduring sort of way. Hence why many B2B businesses look to PR agencies for their expertise. Although an agency may seem a costly affair, having dedicated B2B PR expertise on hand can make budgets stretch much further by achieving the results you want, the first time around.

Join our #B2BPR tribe:

At ec-pr we are passionate about b2b communication. We believe your work is amazing and we want to help you tell the world how extraordinary it is.

Download The Definitive Guide to Analyst Relations and how to ensure its success

READ this post: No Industry Is Too Complex For PR

look at this Infographic: 9 Points To Improve Your PR Brief

The Definitive Guide To Analyst Relations cover

The Definitive Guide to Analyst Relations

and how to ensure its success

The Dos and Don'ts of Analyst Relations to help build credibility with industry influencers.

Download

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How much does PR cost?

Our transparent guide to B2B PR pricing for tech brands.

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What Does A PR Agency Do?

What Does A PR Agency Do?

What Does A PR Agency Do?

What does a PR agency do? what can a PR agency do that you can’t manage in-house?

A PR agency will help your business nurture, enrich, and protect your reputation. This works on the globally understood premise that, in B2B PR, businesspeople only buy from someone that they like and trust.  A poor reputation has a direct impact on your ability to sell and therefore your bottom line. PR campaigns can be designed to focus on different aspects of your business plan and because there are many ways of achieving the desired results, external professional help is often sought from a PR agency. 

What Is PR?

At EC-PR, we define public relations as the management of everything you say and everything you do to create the best possible conditions for your brand to succeed. Words and deeds which must be anchored in truth.

The Chartered Institute of Public Relations (CIPR) define PR:

“Public Relations is about reputation – the result of what you do, what you say and what others say about you.”

Their more detailed definition states:

“Public Relations is the discipline which looks after reputation, with the aim of earning understanding and support and influencing opinion and behaviour. It is the planned and sustained effort to establish and maintain goodwill and mutual understanding between an organisation and its publics.”

Although PR is an ancient discipline, it is constantly evolving because of changes in technology, society, and the way we consume media. The biggest changes have happened in the last ten years, mainly because of the rise of social media and its ability to deliver information and rumour, instantly. Because the media is so fast-moving now, PR professionals are constantly learning, acquiring new skills, and adapting.

Find inspirational angles

What Does A PR Agency Do?

In the most basic sense, A PR agency looks after your external communications – anything which impacts your reputation. They provide expert written and oral communication skills – to present your capabilities, achievements, and opinions; outstanding interpersonal skills – to build press relationships which support your strategy and exceptional listening skills – to capture opportunities, rumour, and competitive threats. However, the PR services on offer will differ between agencies and may look different depending on the type of business you run – B2B PR agencies, for example, work with businesses selling to other businesses (opposed to B2C agencies who will specialise in consumer PR).

The first and most important step in your relationship with a PR agency is establishing what success looks like. What is it you want the PR agency to help you achieve? For example, do you want to change any negative perceptions about your business? Promote a new product or service? Or work on building your brand awareness?

Although a PR agency will work with you to establish your PR objectives, these are separate from and should support your overall business goals.

With goals in place, an agency will then help establish a communication strategy – the action plan for achieving your objectives. An effective B2B communication strategy will include your value proposition, sector prioritisation, detailed audience personas, positioning statements and relevant messaging for each stage of your customer’s buying journey.

Find inspirational angles

Following on from the communication strategy, a PR agency will develop a PR campaign plan. As part of this, an agency will usually be able to help with a marketing asset audit, competitive benchmarking, and of course, the content needed to deliver your campaign. A content calendar will be created – content creation can be done in-house, or the agency may also do this for you.

Finally, a PR agency will deliver your PR campaign, reporting back on their findings and what has been achieved.

All the above can be managed entirely by the PR agency, or you may share responsibility for some of the work with your in-house team. A service level agreement will have been agreed initially, describing exactly who is responsible for what – the most successful relationships are always collaborative though. The more you put into the work with your PR agency, the better your results will be.

Although PR services will differ between agencies, there are many other areas a PR professional will be able to help from media training and crisis communication to news management and lobbying.

Why Partner with a PR Agency?

Without doubt, PR can be done in-house., but the reason PR agencies exist is that in most instances, the breadth of experience and expertise required to deliver an effective PR programme simply isn’t available within the business. By partnering with a PR agency, you are taking advantage of an entire teams’ wealth of experience and expertise acquired over many years. The pound for pound expertise you can buy versus what you can recruit for the same money speaks volumes – it is a clear indicator as to how important your brand’s reputation really is to the business.

A PR agency will also be more disciplined when it comes to setting goals, measuring campaign success and reporting – enabling you to see what is working and the return on your investment – because they have a vested interest in showcasing success.

The word ’partnering’ is particularly important. For many businesses, their PR agency will become part of the team.

A PR agency should act as a seamless extension of the marketing team, partnering either with the Managing Director, or Chief Marketing Officer. Only then can the dream team be established. 

Join our #B2BPR tribe:

If you’ve found this article valuable, you can get more useful insight here:

Download our guide: Everything you need to know for successful B2B PR campaign planning

READ our blog: How can a PR campaign help my business?

watch our video: how to identify your target audience”

PR Guide to B2B PR Campaign Planning

Your complete Guide to B2B PR Campaign Planning

Including example PR campaigns, content calendar templates, and audit checklists.

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Your 8-Step Communication Strategy

8-Step Communication strategy guide

A comprehensive guide to delivering your business goals using intelligent and relevant messaging.

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